Civil War Guide Project
SERIES 147. VOL 3. ADJUTANT GENERAL.
Correspondence to the Governor and Adjutant General of Ohio
June 3-August 13, 1861.

June 3, 1861
George G. Shumard, Surgeon General of Ohio, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Adjutant General H.B. Carrington. Letter forwarding a schedule of all regiments to which he had issued medical supplies, hospital stores, and surgical instruments.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 141]

June 8, 1861
B.B. Brashear, Surgeon, 19th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service), Camp Goddard, Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio. Letter certifying that B.F. Watkins and Charles A. White, privates in Company H, 19th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service), were capable of performing military duty. Together with letter from George Abbot James, Notary Public, Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio certifying that Watkins and White had appeared before him and swore to bear true allegiance to the United States, to serve honestly and faithfully against all enemies or opposers, and to observe and obey the orders of the President and their officers.
2 pp. [Series 147-3: 143]

June 10, 1861
Philipp Muller, Captain of the Lafayette Guards, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison. Letter noting that he had not yet received an answer to his letter of June 5, in which he applied for his captain's commission in Company E, 2nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service), and stated that he took sick at Harrisburg and had to return home, that he had recovered from his illness and was anxious to rejoin his company, and that the coroner (a "distinguished physician") certified that his health was restored.
2 pp. [Series 147-3: 204]

June 19, 1861
E.W. Thomas, Fostoria, Seneca County, Ohio. To Adjutant General H.B. Carrington. Letter enclosing a letter from Captain [Albert M.] Blackman, Company H, 21st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service) to A[lexander] McDonnell, one of his men who was sent home from Camp Taylor and now wished to join his company at Gallipolis; stating that McDonnell did not have a pass and was unable to obtain one, that McDonnell did not have the means to defray his own expenses, and that McDonnell wanted Carrington to send him a pass.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 145]

June 24, 1861
H.R. Brinkerhoff, 1st Lieutenant, Company B, Jerome, Union County, Ohio. To Adjutant General H.B. Carrington. Letter stating that Company B, 1st Regiment, 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, Ohio Volunteer Militia wanted their arms and accoutrements, that Company B hoped for a call at the earliest "necessity," and that Captain Warner had served as a commissioned officer in the Mexican War.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 205]

June 27, 1861
George G. Shumard, Surgeon General of Ohio, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison. Letter informing Dennison that he had received orders from General [George B.] McClellan to repair to Grafton, Virginia by the first train and that he would be leaving that evening, and that he had instructed his secretary to forward any orders or other communications from Dennison since he did not know how long his services would be required in Virginia.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 139]

July 1, 1861
Samuel Beatty, Colonel Commanding, 19th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service), Headquarters, Camp Near Buckhannon, [Virginia]. To Sergeant Major James M. Nash. Letter notifying Nash of his appointment as Adjutant of the 19th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service). Bears note from Governor William Dennison to Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham stating that Nash's commission was to be dated July 1, 1861.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 117]

July 1, 1861
A.M. Goodspeed, Athens, Athens County, Ohio .To Governor William Dennison. Letter stating that he held the office of Ensign with rank of 2nd Lieutenant in Company C, 3rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service), that in consequence of said company's reorganization and his having raised a company for three years' service which was to be received in another regiment, he was resigning his office, that he was not under arrest or returned to court martial for any deficiency or delinquency, and that there were no monies, books, or other property of the state in his possession; and requesting that his resignation be accepted and that he be granted a discharge.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 4]

July 5, 1861
J[acob] Ammen, Colonel, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Chase, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison. Letter transmitting the resignation of Captain L.M. Kellogg of the 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 5]

July 5, 1861
A.T. Snodgrass, New Lisbon, Columbiana County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that he had received a verbal order from Colonel [Samuel] Beatty to proceed and recruit a company for three years' service for the 19th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, asking if he would be justified in doing so without authority from Buckingham, stating that he would have no trouble raising a company and that at least half would be three months' men, asking if he needed blanks and a written order to recruit, and stating that he would be opening a recruiting office in Salem, Ohio.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 158]

July 5, 1861
John J. Wizeman, Captain, Company K, 7th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service), Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that he had seen that Buckingham wanted the post office addresses of returned officers, that his regiment was now a three years' regiment in service in Virginia, that he was a three months' man absent from his regiment three weeks on account of not wishing to go for three years, that he had 32 three months' men with him, that these men had received furlough at Camp Dennison to go home and remain until further ordered, and that they were anxiously waiting to be mustered out of service.
2 pp. [Series 147-3: 162]

July 9, 1861
Charles A. DeVilliers, Charles A. Park, William Kinney, Council of Administration, Camp Dennison, Hamilton County, Ohio. Letter stating that they had selected Lyman N. Freeman as Chaplain of the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three years' service), and that they suggested the rate of pay to be $60.00 per month. Bears endorsement of H.G. Depuy, Colonel Commanding, 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 55]

July 12, 1861
James Rowe, Major General Commanding, Headquarters, 5th Division, Ohio Volunteer Militia, Chillicothe, Ross County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison. Letter requesting remuneration for Major Generals and Brigadier Generals who had spent their time and money in the raising and maintenance of troops; stating that General H.B. Carrington felt they were entitled to compensation, that a number of members of the Ohio Legislature had informed him that they had placed an ample fund at Dennison's disposal to meet such expenses, that he had been raising, organizing and fitting out troops for service and attending to sick and wounded troops at Chillicothe, that he had sixteen companies from his division currently in service, that he had expended over $100.00 in addition to his time, that he thought he was entitled to at least one month's pay and rations, that he was a Brigadier General during the Mexican War and employed three weeks in raising and maintaining troops, and that Governor Mordecai Bartley had allowed him pay for his expenses.
2 pp. [Series 147-3: 164]

July 17, 1861
M.B. Wright, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Colonel George S. Mygatt. Letter regarding charges for medical services performed, and stating that if there were no fixed charges, he wished to be paid $25.00.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 219]

July 18, 1861
E.H. Johnson, Steubenville, Jefferson County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter from the 2nd Lieutenant of the Steuben Artillery Company, offering his company for active service for the term of three years, and requesting arms.
2 pp. [Series 147-3: 64]

July 19, 1861
M.H. West, Bellefontaine, Logan County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter of introduction recommending S.F. Hoge, a Hardin County lawyer and member of Company F, 26th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for a position in the Quartermaster's Department connected with the 31st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 122]

July 22, 1861
E. McLarren, Lyndon Station, Ross County, Ohio. To A.S. Miller, Columbus, Ohio .Letter stating that about thirty to fifty of their boys were anxious for a transfer to United States service if they could go as a company, that they would join some other company if not transferred, that they were getting along very well in drilling and wanted arms, that the boys were getting stale after drilling so long without arms, that they would take proper care of any arms provided, and that they were willing to serve along the Ohio River if nowhere else.
3 pp. [Series 147-3: 65]

July 22, 1861
J. Williams, Assistant Adjutant of General George B. McClellan, Headquarters, Army of Occupation, Western Virginia, Beverly. Copy of Special Orders No. 29 discharging First Lieutenant John F. Hoy, Company E, 6th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry who had tendered his resignation on account of physical debility.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 116]

July [22?], 1861
T[homas] Worthington, Washington, D.C. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter regarding the Union defeat at First Manassas (Bull Run); stating that the defeat was a "terrible dishonor," that the Ohio troops in the Washington, D.C. area could boast no more defects of discipline than troops at Camp Dennison, that the main causes of the "disaster" were a lack of artillery on the federal side and its use on an unexpected scale by the rebels, that General Winfield Scott had opposed any material increase of artillery, that Brigadier General Irvin McDowell had been advised by Brigadier General Joseph K.F. Mansfield of the existence of masked rebel batteries two weeks prior to the battle and still marched his men upon them, that many of the men had stated that Colonel G.W.B. Tomkins of the 2nd Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry and Colonel Alexander McDowell McCook of the 1st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service) both refused to advance at Brigadier General Robert C. Schenck's order taunting him with the affair at Vienna, Virginia, that the loss of the Ohio troops was "very trifling," that Union forces were also deficient in cavalry, that the teamsters were afraid to move forward and created terrible confusion in the retreat, that Major George Sykes, 14th Regiment, United States Infantry complained that the Ohio troops who were to have sustained his battery fell back in disorder and compelled his retreat, that the men all spoke well of Colonel Alexander McDowell McCook claiming that his regiment came off in good order, that he doubted the claim, that Lieutenant Colonel Rodney Mason of the 2nd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service) seemed "paralyzed" and neither Brigadier General Robert C. Schenck nor anyone gave coherent orders after the battle commenced, that the defeat would in the end cost $100,000,000 and myriads of lives, that since his arrival on [July? 6] the drunkenness of the troops had been continuous with little or nothing done to prevent it, that hundreds had lain out on the side walks every night, that one fourth of the 10,000 who came into the city the previous day were drunk by sunset, that the volunteers would be the government if at least 60,000 regulars were not enlisted within a year, that Major General Robert Patterson of Pennsylvania was much blamed for the Union defeat at First Manassas (Bull Run) for not cutting off Joseph E. Johnston's march via the Manassas Gap Railroad as should have been done, that he had talked with many of the Ohio troops from the Hocking Valley and thought it possible to raise one or two companies of artillery from the most intelligent of them, and that the Union defeat at First Manassas (Bull Run) "must of course" influence the conduct of Congress and protract the session. Together with a copy of a note addressed to Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States attesting to Worthington's military experience and loyalty.
8 pp. [Series 147-3: 193]

July 23, [1861]
J.F. McNeal, Iberia, Morrow County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter asking if part of a company of artillery sufficient to man one gun would be accepted for three years' service, what number was required for a squad, and what officers they would be entitled to.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 64]

July 24, 1861
John H. Carter, Captain, Company H, 3rd Regiment, Militia of the Reserve, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison (Carter's cousin) .Letter stating that his company had been on duty guarding the bridges on the Marietta and Cincinnati Railroad, that he wished to know what pay his men were to receive and how soon they could get it, and that he understood the three months' men had been ordered to Cincinnati to be mustered out of service from the Marietta and Cincinnati Railroad; requesting that he and his command be ordered back to their former position at Scott's Landing along the Marietta and Cincinnati Railroad; stating that his men were very anxious to go into service; asking if they could charge the State of Ohio for their uniforms; and stating that their equipments were very much used up during their three weeks' service since they did not draw any blouses to wear while on duty.
2 pp. [Series 147-3: 88]

July 24, 1861
T.J. Cram, Captain, Grafton, Virginia. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter recommending Lieutenant Colonel John W. Fuller for a colonelcy of one of the new regiments to be formed for three years' service.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 89]

July 24, 1861
W[illiam] P[arker] Cutler, Washington City, House of Representatives. To Governor William Dennison. Letter stating that he had applied to the War Department to accept a regiment of infantry which they were willing to do provided it did not interfere with any arrangements Dennison had previously made, that he expected the regiment to be organized in the neighborhood of Marietta extending perhaps into adjoining counties, that he hoped Dennison would not fail to find a place for the regiment in the Ohio quota, that the people in southern Ohio were very desirous to raise a cavalry regiment or two, that the people inhabiting this comparatively hilly and rough country were accustomed from youth to horseback exercise, and that the horses were of good quality and also accustomed to difficult service.
2 pp. [Series 147-3: 142]

July 24, 1861
F.H. Loring, 1st Lieutenant, Company A, Center Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that he had learned that Buckingham proposed to let them have some muskets now at Gallipolis, that his company consisted of 60 members, 54 of whom were uniformed, that they should have 100 stand of arms in case of emergency, that they needed instructions regarding whether the arms were to be kept in an armory or given to individual members of the company when not on drill, and that they generally felt "somewhat anxious" owing to their proximity to the rebels and their "depradations."
2 pp. [Series 147-3: 72]

July 24, 1861
N.H. Van Vorhes, Athens, Athens County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison. Letter stating that Camp Wool would be a good point at which to recruit one or more regiments for three years' service, that he presumed that two or more companies of three months' men from Athens County would soon be returned home and out of these one or more new companies might be raised, that Athens County now had six companies in active service with three more in the process of organization and others talked of, that he thought Athens County had already contributed her full share and yet was determined to do better still, and that Athens County could furnish a thousand men if necessary.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 16]

July 25, 1861
Johnson Bean, Captain, Hiram Rood, Lieutenant, Richard J. Alcock, Lieutenant, Douglas Blues, Marietta, Washington County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter returning their commissions since they organized as active volunteer militia and made their returns as such and not as Militia of the Reserve, stating that they were uniforming as fast as possible under the regulations for volunteer militia, and asking if the United States or fatigue cap would suffice or if they must have the regulation cap which was hard to obtain.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 45]

July 25, 1861
J.D. Cotton, Marietta, Washington County, Ohio. To Dr. George G. Shumard [Surgeon General of Ohio]. Letter inquiring as to the proper person to pay the bills of the hospital at Marietta; stating that he was compelled to employ private nurses, etc., as there were no soldiers left to serve as nurses, cooks, etc., that most of these private nurses, etc., were poor and needed pay for their services, that they had a very convenient and well arranged hospital situated in a very healthy location and capable of accommodating about sixty patients, that there were currently twenty at the hospital and that most of them would soon be well enough to be discharged, and that there were over one hundred sick in the hospital at Parkersburg, Virginia and that the accommodations were very poor with some patients quartered in a stable; and asking if it would not be best to have some of the patients at Parkersburg moved to the hospital at Marietta.
3 pp. [Series 147-3: 51]

July 25, 1861
J.A. Jones, Colonel, et. al., 25th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Chase, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison. Letter requesting that Surgeon L.G. Meyer not be transferred from the 25th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry to the 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 124]

July 25, 1861
John C. Lane, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison. Letter requesting that the three months' volunteers be paid and mustered out of service; stating that he had enlisted Company C of the Guthrie Grays which went into camp as part of the 6th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three month's service), that he had declined to accept the same position for three years because he did not feel that the field officers were competent, that he was consequently compelled to leave camp on furlough and that most of his officers left with him, that he had been ordered to enroll a company of one hundred men out of the three months' volunteers for the purpose of doing police duty upon the Marietta [and Cincinnati] Railroad, that he obeyed promptly and in six days had his company organized and on duty, that their time was now up and that it was impossible to find anyone who would take the responsibility to release and pay them, that there were some six hundred men in the state who were in the same condition as his company, and that so large a group should have some attention paid to their wants and rights.
4 pp. [Series 147-3: 63]

July 25, 1861
John Stone, Belpre, Washington County, Ohio .To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that they ought to have one hundred stand of arms, that their company numbered sixty men and that efforts were being made to increase the number to eighty or more, that there were sufficient men to use the arms who would fill in the ranks at short notice if an emergency arose in their vicinity, and that small boats were still running between Belpre and Gallipolis.
2 pp. [Series 147-3: 72]

July 25, 1861
Gould A. Sturges, Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter requesting a position.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 53]

July 25, 1861
Crafts J. Wright, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that there were many who thought the city and county in danger, that there were far fewer "active forces" in the area than ever before, that the best part of the citizenry withdrew from the Home Guard organized as Militia of Reserve owing to the inefficiency of many of the officers, that the remaining material was a "bad one proportionally," that a large number of persons had ceased to drill, that the city was felt to be defenseless due to a lack of trained and equipped home guards and the withdrawal of regular troops, that Kentucky could not be relied upon for one day, that the South had the prestige of success due to the Union defeat at First Manassas (Bull Run) and would follow it up if possible, that he could not understand why arms were not given out when ample security was given, that he could find "suitable" officers and organize at least two regiments under the most strict discipline if he received assurance that arms would be furnished, and that Cincinnati had already given the state approximately $250,000 and had $50,000; asking if Governor William Dennison would take some of this money to provide the locality with muskets and a battery of flying artillery consisting of six-pounders; and stating that those who recognized the importance of Cincinnati's location and the significance of an attack upon the city would understand that the matters he addressed were not solely of local interest.
3 pp. [Series 147-3: 130]

July 26, 1861
Lorin Andrews, Gambier, Knox County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison. Letter recommending Edward Sturges, a former pupil; stating that he had returned from western Virginia where he had an opportunity to observe and learn from others regarding Dennison's son, Neil, that he was greatly pleased with what he had seen and heard, and that Neil's fellow officers and secessionist prisoners in his charge had frequently spoken highly of him; thanking Mrs. Dennison for the havelock which he had often worn; stating that he intended to return to his regiment the next day; requesting that Dennison urge some U.S. Paymaster to pay off his regiment since they had not received "a cent yet;" and stating that Dennison had done better by the state troops than the U.S. had by his regiment.
2 pp. [Series 147-3: 53]

July 26, 1861
N.S. Berry, Governor and Commander-in-Chief, State of New Hampshire, Executive Department, Concord. Printed general order regarding Hiram Berdan's proposal to raise a corps of rifle sharpshooters to be selected from the best shots in the loyal states in the Union; stating that it was desirable that New Hampshire should furnish and equip her quota, that he therefore called for volunteers for one company, that the officers of the company were to be appointed and commissioned the same as other company officers in the several regiments of volunteers from New Hampshire, and that no man would be accepted or mustered into service who could not, when firing at a rest, at a distance of two hundred yards, put ten consecutive shots in a target, the average distance not to exceed five inches from the center of the bull's eye to the center of the ball.
1 p. [Series 147-3: 127]