Civil War Guide Project
SERIES 147. VOLUME 25. ADJUTANT GENERAL.
Correspondence to the Governor and Adjutant General of Ohio,
October 11, 1861-February 10, 1862.

October 11, 1861
Newton Schleich, et. al., Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison. Letter signed by sixteen individuals; recommending Captain Henry H. Giesy for appointment as Major of the 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and stating that they believed Giesy well qualified for the office, that given the manner in which Giesy discharged the duties of Captain in the 17th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service), he won the approval and admiration of those who had the best opportunity of judging his conduct, and that they knew Giesy to be a gentleman of education, strict integrity, great energy, and devoted to the service. Bears the endorsements of Lewis Heyl, Francis B. Pond, Colonel, P. Odlin, Alfred McVeigh, W.E. Finck, John A. Sinnet, B.R. Cowen, and H.H. Hunter.
3 pp. [Series 147-25: 38]

October 14, 1861
G[eorge] W. Andrews, late Colonel, 15th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service), Wapakoneta, Auglaize County, Ohio. To Friend [William O.] Collins. Letter recommending Dr. [John] O. Ferrell for the position of Lieutenant Colonel in Collins' regiment [6th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry]; and stating that Collins would find Ferrell attentive, able, and efficient, and that he believed Collins would not find anyone who could afford him more aid than Ferrell.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 82]

October 15, 1861
G. Volney Dorsey, Piqua, Miami County, Ohio. To Colonel [William O.] Collins. Letter enclosing a brief note from their mutual friend, G[eorge] W. Andrews of Auglaize County and late of the 15th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service), recommending Dr. [John] O. Ferrell of Piqua for the position of Lieutenant Colonel in Collins' regiment [6th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry]; and stating that he would be glad to see Ferrell occupy this place or that of Major, that Ferrell was laboring incessantly to raise his two hundred men and would undoubtedly have them ready in good time, that Governor William Dennison had promised to appoint whoever was recommended by Collins for said positions, and that if, under existing circumstances, Collins was willing to send him a recommendation of Ferrell for either of the positions in question, he would feel bound at all times, when in his power, to reciprocate the favor towards Collins or any friend.
2 pp. [Series 147-25: 83]

October 29, 1861
H[erman] G. Depuy, Colonel, 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Keys, Romney, [Virginia]. To Governor William Dennison. Letter stating that being conscientious in all he did on behalf of the great struggle for constitutional freedom in their disputed country, he felt it his duty to address a few lines to Dennison regarding the regiment which he had the honor to command, that about August 1, while in command of the post at Pendleton, Maryland, his horse bolted and crushed him under a low shed, that this resulted in a serious injury to his spine and side causing partial paralysis of his whole right side, particularly his right leg, that he was entirely helpless without a staff, that he would have hopes of a final recovery if he did not have almost daily symptoms of a second stroke, that in view of his helplessness and the probability of a still worse condition hastened by the exposures of the field, he had come to the conclusion that it was his duty to resign as Colonel of the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that in doing so, he did not lose sight of the interests of his command and would therefore state that drunkenness among officers had caused him more trouble than all other vices combined, that in view of this fact, he felt it his duty to recommend Captain Frances W. Butterfield of Company C as a suitable person to fill his place, that Butterfield was temperate to totally abstinent, well drilled, thorough, and full of ardor, that Dennison would never regret Butterfield's appointment, that he learned from good authority that the regiment had requested Lieutenant Colonel [Charles A.] Park and Major [Franklin] Sawyer to resign in view of inefficiency and intemperance, that he would earnestly recommend Adjutant Joseph R. Swigert for Lieutenant Colonel and Wilbur F. Pearce for Major, that both men were temperate and in every way qualified, that if the regiment took a vote, Swigert and Pearce would be elected, that he believed they were the only persons whose appointment would give satisfaction, that he regretted the long separation from his command and still more regretted the necessity that now compelled him to resign a position which he so much desired to fill, that when he entered the service of his country, he entered it with an honest intention to serve it faithfully to the end of the great struggle, that if he regained his health, he would surely be in the field, that infirmity alone could prevent it, that only in the hands of Swigert and Pearce was his regiment safe for future usefulness, that he had watched the progress of intemperance while prostrated upon a bed of suffering, that while he was in immediate command, intemperance was confined to a few officers, that after he left, intemperance spread until drunkenness was actually the order of the day, that since his return, by the aid of Butterfield, Swigert, and Pearce, he had succeeded in suppressing the "ruinous evil" and soberness, quietness, and duty were seen to be prevailing, that the total demoralization of his command grew out of the intemperance of his field officers and consequent inattention to the interest of the regiment while he was sick and absent, that Butterfield acted as Major in the Romney battle and his coolness during the terrible raking fire of the enemy's battery was remarkable, that Swigert was mounted near him, where shot and shell fell like hail, and exhibited unsurpassed bravery, that the same could be said of Pearce, and that his resignation would take place on November 9, 1861.
4 pp. [Series 147-25: 212]

[November 9?, 1861]
B[enjamin] F. Kelley, Brigadier General, Romney, Virginia. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter enclosing letters announcing the resignations of the Colonel and Lieutenant Colonel of the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and stating that the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had been exceedingly unfortunate in many respects, that the field officers had been separated from the regiment by sickness or some other cause during the entire summer and the regiment was sadly demoralized, that he could say with great frankness that he did not regret the opportunity the regiment had to be officered by more competent and efficient officers, that a large portion of the material of the regiment was good and, in the hands of laborious and competent field officers, would make a good regiment, that the regiment was with him in the late affair at Romney, that under Colonel [Herman G.] Depuy, assisted by his Assistant Adjutant General (B[enjamin] F. Hawkes), the regiment displayed great steadiness and coolness under fire, that he learned that it was the almost unanimous desire of the officers and men of the brigade that Hawkes should be appointed Colonel, that while he would regret losing the valuable services of Hawkes from his staff, he could not in justice to himself and to the service object to Hawkes' promotion, that he would be exceedingly gratified by said promotion, that Hawkes had received a thorough military education at West Point, that Hawkes was a gentleman of good habits and good address, that Hawkes was industrious and energetic, that he had no hesitation in saying that Hawkes would be a credit to himself, the Governor, and his State if the appointment was made, and that in the late affair at Romney, Hawkes led the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and the forces, and exhibited great coolness and gallantry. Contains clauses from the official reports of the Battles of Romney and Blues Gap in Virginia regarding the conduct of Hawkes.
2 pp. [Series 147-25: 108]

[November 9?, 1861]
John S. Mason, Colonel, 4th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Romney, Virginia. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter stating that he learned that the Colonel of the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had tendered his resignation and that Captain B[enjamin] F. Hawkes, Assistant Adjutant General to General [Benjamin F.] Kelley, was an applicant for the position, that he felt it a duty and a pleasure to note the qualifications of Hawkes, that Hawkes was in every way qualified for the position, was a good soldier, a strict disciplinarian, a high toned gentleman, and a man of undoubted courage, that in their attack on Romney, he had full opportunity to judge of Hawkes' capabilities, that Hawkes was exposed to the heaviest fire, and aided them by his coolness and personal daring in advancing at the head of their troops, giving confidence and steadiness to the men in their advance, and that he hoped the Governor would pardon him for offering any suggestions in this matter, but he did it for the best interests of the regiment and the service.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 105]

[November 9?, 1861]
John S. Mason, Colonel, James Cantwell, Lieutenant Colonel, and James H. Godman, Major, 4th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Romney, Virginia. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter stating that the field officers of the 4th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry recommended Captain Benjamin F. Hawkes of Ohio as a gentleman well qualified and in every way competent to command a regiment in the U.S. service, that they had known Hawkes as the Assistant Adjutant General of General [Benjamin F.] Kelley, that Hawkes had held said position to the entire satisfaction of Kelley and all others connected with that department of the army, that Hawkes fought with them in the Battle of Romney and distinguished himself by his gallant conduct on that occasion, and that they would be greatly pleased to have the Governor appoint Hawkes as Colonel of the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Colonel [Herman G.] Depuy.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 107]

[November 9?, 1861]
C.E. Swearengen, Major, G.W. Harrison, Captain, Thomas Morris, Captain, et. al., Romney, Virginia. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter signed by commissioned officers of General [Benjamin F.] Kelley's brigade; and stating that they had information that Captain B[enjamin] F. Hawkes of Ohio would probably be an applicant for the Colonelcy of the 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry to become vacant by the resignation of the present incumbent, that they begged leave to unite their testimony to Hawkes' efficiency as an officer and a gentleman, that their opportunities of making themselves acquainted with Hawkes had been of the most favorable character, that as the Assistant Adjutant General of Brigadier General Kelley, Hawkes had rendered entire satisfaction to the officers of the brigade with whom he had business transactions, that in the field, particularly in the Battle of Romney, Hawkes had exhibited all the qualities of a gallant officer and brave man, and that under these circumstances, they desired that the Governor commission Hawkes as a Colonel.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 106]

November 20, 1861
George D. Ruggles, Assistant Adjutant General, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D.C. To the Governor of Ohio. Duplicate of a letter reporting that 1st Lieutenant W.R. Richener, 25th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had resigned effective October 31, 1861.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 32]

December 31, 1861
George Arnold, Captain, Company H, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. To the Honorable A.G. Riddle, Washington City. Letter stating that in October 1861, while stationed at Cheat Mountain, western Virginia, he along with hundreds of others was afflicted with typhoid fever and rheumatism, that he had tendered his resignation, that he obtained a relief from duty by General Reynolds and returned to Cleveland, that unexpectedly, he recovered his health and reported himself to the Governor, that he had not received notice of the acceptance of his resignation, that he learned from the Adjutant General at Washington that his resignation was never officially received, that he was therefore withdrawing his resignation, that he would immediately start for Kentucky to rejoin his regiment and fight the "oligarchs", and that he would feel obligated if Riddle used his influence to ensure that he was retained in the service and that the withdrawal of his resignation was granted.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 97]

January 6, 1862
A.G. Riddle, Washington. To Adjutant General [Lorenzo] Thomas. Letter enclosing the letter from George Arnold dated December 31, 1861; and stating that Arnold was a meritorious officer and ought to be returned. Bears a note dated January 22, 1862, from George D. Ruggles, Assistant Adjutant General, referring the letters to the commanding officer of the Department of the Ohio. Also bears a note dated January 26, 1862, from O[liver] D. Greene, Assistant Adjutant General, Department of the Ohio, referring the letters to Colonel [Jacob] Ammen for a report on the case. Also bears a note dated January 31, 1862, from J[acob] Ammen, Colonel Commanding, 10th Brigade, 4th Division, reporting on the case. Also bears a note dated February 3, 1862, from D[on] C[arlos] Buell, Brigadier General Commanding, Department of the Ohio, referring the letters to the Governor of Ohio, who had full jurisdiction in the premises and exclusive control of it.
2 pp. [Series 147-25: 98]

January 9, 1862
E.P. Fitch, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster, U.S. Army, Quartermaster's Office, Gauley Bridge, [Virginia]. To ? Letter stating that it afforded him great pleasure to recommend F.L. Torrence for the position of 1st Lieutenant in the U.S. Army, that Torrence was well qualified, and had proven himself to be a soldier of the first class and a gentleman of good judgment, that Torrence was in the midst of the two engagements of the army in western Virginia and experienced the heat of battle, that Torrence exhibited more than ordinary ability during these engagements, and that he could say more regarding Torrence's bravery and soldierly conduct, but hoped what he had said was sufficient.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 211]

January 9, 1862
Finton L. Torrence, Assistant Quartermaster's Office, Gauley Bridge, Virginia. To Joseph Torrence, Cincinnati, Ohio. Letter stating that lately he had devoted considerable attention to military affairs and felt he possessed abilities which made him competent for more active service, that he did not utter these sentiments with the air of a braggadocio and did not desire to be considered egotistical, but since he felt competent to undertake more active service, he saw no reason why he should not give utterance to his feelings and in terms not to be mistaken, that he was well aware that there were many in the army whose qualifications would fit them for any position, but who either from the force of circumstances or some whim of their own were content to trudge along with the masses, and that the point at which he was now aiming could not be attained without assistance; requesting that Joseph Torrence spare no effort in securing him a Lieutenancy in the 12th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and stating that if said position had already been conferred on a more favored applicant, then a similar appointment in some other regiment would prove highly acceptable, that receiving such an appointment was his aim, and time was of no consequence, and that money was of secondary importance.
3 pp. [Series 147-25: 210]

January 9, 1862
F[inton] L. Torrence, Assistant Quartermaster's Office, Gauley Bridge, Virginia. To Joseph Torrence, Cincinnati, Ohio. Letter stating that he deemed it advisable, in connection with his letter, to transmit a letter of recommendation from his present employer, Captain E.P. Fitch, Assistant Quartermaster, U.S. Army.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 212]

January 13, 1862
R[utherford] B. Hayes, Lieutenant Colonel Commanding, 23rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Union, Fayetteville, Virginia. To Brigadier General L[orenzo] Thomas, Adjutant General, U.S. Army. Letter stating that in compliance with paragraph XIII of General Orders No. 105 dated Washington, December 3, 1861, he was reporting that the 23rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had nine hundred and one officers and men, a deficiency below the standard of one hundred and nine men, and that after discharging all who were unfit for duty by reason of disability, the regiment would require about one hundred and fifty men to fill it up to the standard required. Bears a note dated January 29, 1862, from George D. Ruggles, Assistant Adjutant General, Adjutant General's Office, referring the letter to the Governor of Ohio.
2 pp. [Series 147-25: 46]

January 13, 1862
John H. Piatt, Camp Buell, near Louisville, Kentucky. To Assistant Adjutant General R[odney] Mason. Letter stating that Lieutenant James M. Allen, Quartermaster of the 1st Battalion, 1st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, was about to resign and wanted his son, Madison Allen, appointed to fill the place, that James M. Allen was resigning on account of the wants of his large family at home, that should James M. Allen's resignation be accepted, he would cheerfully unite with other officers of the 1st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry in recommending Madison Allen as eminently qualified to fill the place, that Madison Allen was a young man of about 21 years of age, with fine business talents and activity, that Madison Allen had been with them assisting his father in the duties of Quartermaster, and was well broken in and a general favorite with the regiment, that the testimony to be given by other officers of the 1st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry in higher positions than himself, would attest to the fact of Madison Allen's capability, that knowing Madison Allen well, he thought the appointment was eminently fit to be made, that a word from Mason would bless their regiment with a good Quartermaster, that Mrs. Piatt was at Mac-a-cheek, very well, and, he presumed, very happy for she now had everything her own way, and that he was getting along fine and expected to be Major before the war was through.
2 pp. [Series 147-25: 91]

January 16, 1862
S[amuel] S. Carroll, Colonel, 8th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Kelley, Patterson Creek, Virginia. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that 2nd Lieutenant Charles A. Wright of Company H and 2nd Lieutenant Anthony S. Sutton of Company D had tendered their resignations, which would undoubtedly be accepted by the General commanding the department, and that the vacancies should be filled as soon as they occurred.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 215]

January 16, 1862
C.G. Enyart, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. To Captain G[ates] P. Thurston, 1st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Kentucky. Letter stating that he understood from some remarks made by Colonel [Edwin A.] Parrott that there would likely be a change in the field officers of the 1st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and a vacancy in the Majority, that he was led further to believe that Thurston's modesty would likely deter him from accepting the position or at least from making any effort to obtain it, that he believed Thurston was as fully competent for the position as any Captain in the regiment, that it would not be any injustice to Thurston's immediate command, but rather an advantage to those in it who followed him up, that as Thurston would not leave the regiment, it need not necessarily break up any of his present associations, that chances of this kind were too rare to be rashly put aside and he did not think Thurston was doing himself justice, that Thurston had many friends who would be glad for his promotion, and that he hoped to hear, should the vacancy occur, that Thurston would not only accept, but make active endeavors to obtain it. Together with a note dated January 19, 1862, from Thurston to John G. Lowe; enclosing the letter from Enyart; and stating that though fully alive (as every soldier was) to the value of promotion, at present he would feel a delicacy in offering himself for the position with much earnestness, that the senior Captain of the regiment ([Joab A.] Stafford), although not exactly the man for the place, could not be called incompetent in the present "militia" days, that if it was the desire of the department that seniority in the regiment should prevail, he would have nothing to say on the subject, that if the department looked to outside selections in or out of the regiment, he would then feel tempted to offer himself as a candidate, that he would only expect his name to be presented at Columbus through Lowe or other friends, that he would not wish, under the circumstances, to make any personal application or effort to that effect, and that he probably would not have thought of the subject had not General McCook and others suggested it to him.
5 pp. [Series 147-25: 127]

January 17, 1862
I[srael] D. Clark, Probate Office, Van Wert, Van Wert County, Ohio. To Dear Sir. Letter stating that he wished the addressee to use personal influence to obtain for him the position of Major of the 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry now at Camp Lyon, that he thought he was entitled to the position, that the Department knew about his personal qualifications and the addressee knew about the sacrifice he had made, that in the Spring of 1861, he left a good law practice, that he found, upon his return, that there was nothing to do in his line, that Van Wert County had over 500 men now in the field and not one regimental officer, that he thought the addressee could go to the Governor with the facts and demand his appointment, that he wished the addressee to go to [Philetus W.] Norris, member of the Ohio House of Representatives from Williams County, and request his cooperation in the matter, that he hoped the addressee would give the matter his early and earnest attention, and that everything depended upon the addressee's success.
3 pp. [Series 147-25: 34]

January 17, 1862
R[euben] Frisbie, Probate Office, Van Wert, Van Wert County, Ohio. To the Honorable P[hiletus] W. Norris, House of Representatives, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Letter stating that he believed there were now some 300 men from Van Wert County in the 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that he was informed this regiment was without a Major and some other field officers, that Van Wert County, given the number of volunteers it had furnished the 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and other regiments, was entitled to a consideration in the appointment of at least a portion of the officers of the 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry provided the county could furnish applicants who were in all respects competent and worthy, etc., that Captain I[srael] D. Clark of Van Wert, Ohio, who raised the first company of three months' volunteers in Van Wert County, would, if appointed, cheerfully accept the appointment of Major of the 46th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that it was the opinion of many that Clark would fill said office with honor to himself, satisfaction to the regiment, and justice to the country, and that Clark was partially acquainted with Norris, having met him at Phillipi and Buckhannon while in the three months' service in Virginia; requesting that Norris lend his influence in behalf of Clark; and stating that there had been no distribution of agricultural reports in Van Wert County since 1858, with the exception of four copies of the 1859 report which A.P.J. Snyder sent him for distribution last session, that several individuals locally were much interested in having said reports, and that he wished Norris would try and get Snyder to furnish a few copies of the report for 1860-1861 to some of them in Van Wert County.
3 pp. [Series 147-25: 36]

January 17, 1862
R[utherford] B. Hayes, Lieutenant Colonel Commanding, 23rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Union, Fayetteville, Virginia. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that it was deemed proper that the recommendation of 2nd Lieutenant R. S[kiles] Gardner for promotion to a 1st Lieutenancy in the 23rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry be, for the present, withdrawn.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 19]

January 17, 1862
John P. Holt, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. To the Honorable S[eneca] O. Griswold. Letter asking Griswold to see the Adjutant General and find out what they had done with his case; and stating that he had not resigned, but the Colonel of the 6th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry ordered him to Columbus to be mustered out of service, that the Adjutant General sent his name to Washington, and that he wanted to know if they had heard from Washington and if he was going to be paid when the 6th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry was paid.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 51]

January 17, 1862
E[rastus] B. Tyler, Colonel Commanding, 3rd Brigade, General Lander's Division, Camp Kelly, Patterson's Creek, Virginia. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that he had just learned that Lieutenant H[arry] G. Armstrong, Aide-de-Camp to Brigadier General [Frederick W.] Lander and late Adjutant of the 5th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, was an applicant for the position made vacant by the resignation of Major [William] Gaskill, 5th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that he had been intimately associated with Armstrong, and did not hesitate to recommend him as a gentleman and officer well and fitly qualified for the position, and that he urged Armstrong's appointment, knowing that Tod would never have cause to regret having promoted so worthy and efficient an officer.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 103]

January 18, 1862
S[amuel] H. Dunning, Colonel, 5th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Commanding 2nd Brigade, Lander's Division, Camp Kelly, Patterson's Creek. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that Major William Gaskill, 5th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had resigned his position; recommending that Tod appoint Lieutenant and Adjutant H[arry] G. Armstrong of his command to fill the office of Major; and stating that Armstrong was an able and competent officer and was in every way fitted to be a field officer, that while there were several candidates for the position, he was confident that the appointment of Armstrong would give general satisfaction to the officers of the regiment, and that he hoped Tod would make the appointment as recommended.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 104]

January 18, 1862
D.A. Haynes, Chairman, E.S. Young, and Thomas B. Tilton, [County Military Committee], Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that Herman Rau, now in the 37th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, desired an appointment as Lieutenant in the 58th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that they thought Rau qualified and fit for the position and recommended his appointment, that they thought Rau could recruit successfully for the 58th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and that Rau had a letter from the Major. Bears the endorsement of Lewis B. Gunckel, State Senator for Montgomery County and Preble County, and J[efferson] Patterson, State Representative.
1 p. [Series 147-25: 22]