Civil War Guide Project
SERIES 147. VOLUME 34. ADJUTANT GENERAL.
Correspondence to the Governor and Adjutant General of Ohio,
September 21, 1861-June 2, 1862.

September 21, 1861
George D. Ruggles, Assistant Adjutant General, Adjutant General's Office, Washington. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter reporting that the resignation of Captain James McGarr, 13th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had been accepted to take effect on September 15, 1861.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 132]

September 23, 1861
George D. Ruggles, Assistant Adjutant General, Adjutant General's Office, Washington. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter reporting that the resignation of 1st Lieutenant B. Benkler, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had been accepted to take effect on September 14, 1861.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 133]

October 2, 1861
J[acob] Ammen, Colonel, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Cheat Mountain Summit, Virginia. To ? Letter stating that 2nd Lieutenant Jacob Diehl of the 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry having tendered his resignation and the same having been accepted by General [William S.] Rosecrans, he was relieved from duty in the regiment, that it afforded him pleasure to bear testimony to the good conduct, faithfulness, and zeal of Diehl as an officer in the 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and that Diehl had his best wishes for future success. Bears the endorsement of Samuel A. Gilbert, Lieutenant Colonel, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 73]

October 2, 1861
George M. Bacon, 1st Lieutenant, and [John H.] Elbert, 2nd Lieutenant, Company E, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Cheat Mountain Pass, Western Virginia. To ? Letter stating that they had found Lieutenant [Jacob] Diehl of Company H, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry to be a good officer and a gentleman in manner and conduct the past four months.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 72]

October 2, 1861
A[rmstead] T.M. Cockerill, Captain, David Thomas, 1st Lieutenant, and H[enry] S. Harding, 2nd Lieutenant, Company D, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Camp Cheat Mountain Summit, Virginia. To Whom It May Concern. Letter stating that having been associated with Lieutenant [Jacob] Diehl in the service since the organization of the 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, they begged leave to recommend him as a soldier, a gentleman, and a brother officer with whom they were loath to part.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 72]

October 2, 1861
David J. Higgins, Captain, Enoch Well, 1st Lieutenant, and D.C. Wadsworth, 2nd Lieutenant, Company C, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Cheat Mountain Summit. To ? Letter stating that Jacob Diehl, 2nd Lieutenant, Company H, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had resigned his office in said company, and that they were writing to express their deep regret at his resignation and their high appreciation of his merits as an officer and his high character as a gentleman.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 72]

October 2, 1861
James R. Inskeep, Captain, and A[ndrew] J. Garrison, 1st Lieutenant, Company K, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Cheat Mountain Summit. To ? Letter stating that 2nd Lieutenant [Jacob] Diehl of Company H, 24th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had resigned his office in said company; and recommending Diehl as a good and industrious officer highly capable of commanding a company as said officer.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 73]

November 27, 1861
E[dward] P. Fyffe, Colonel, 26th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Urbana, Champaign County, Ohio. To Governor William Dennison. Letter recommending William M. Este of Cincinnati for appointment to the office of Lieutenant to fill any vacancy not otherwise already provided for in the 26th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and stating that by intelligence, superior education, high character, and every quality, Este was well fitted for the position solicited for him. Bears the endorsement of Robert C. Schenck, Brigadier General.
2 pp. [Series 147-34: 100]

December 10, 1861
Dennis J. Toohy, Treasury Department, Washington. To Governor William Dennison. Letter reminding Dennison of his desire for a field appointment in the Ohio volunteers; and stating that should it be in Dennison's power to call him into active service, he would endeavor to discharge his duties as became a soldier of the Union and of Ohio, and that he was grateful for Dennison's friendly recognition.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 41]

December 10, 1861
Elisha Whittlesey, Treasury Department, Comptroller's Office, [Washington]. To Governor William Dennison. Letter stating that Dennis Toohey, formerly of Cincinnati, Ohio and now a clerk in the office of the Secretary of the Treasury, desired to enter the army of the United States as a Major, that he had boarded with Toohey since the latter part of April and had a good opportunity to know him, that Toohey was a gentleman of intelligence, of good morals and habits, of great energy and perseverance, and of good judgment, that considering Toohey's age, he had mingled much in society in different parts of the United States, that Toohey's temper and disposition were calculated to win the respect and confidence of those with whom he was associated, that he had no reason to doubt Toohey's courage, that if Toohey should receive a commission in the army, he would discharge his duty with fidelity and skill, that he commended Toohey for Dennison's favorable consideration, and that he knew of no applicant more worthy.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 42]

December 18, 1861
William B. Castle, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that he had been requested by Joseph M. Poe of Brooklyn, Cuyahoga County, Ohio to offer testimony regarding his capacity, integrity, and general fitness for employment in the public service, and that any appointment conferred upon Poe, suitable to his capacity, would be patronage worthily bestowed.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 51]

December 18, 1861
J.M. Coffinberry, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that Joseph M. Poe of Brooklyn, Cuyahoga County, Ohio was desirous of obtaining some position in the public service in which he could be useful to the state or nation, that Poe had read law, but was not in practice, that Poe was a man of intelligence, of temperate and active character, and of unsullied reputation, that Poe had been zealous and efficient in promoting the interests of the recruiting service without compensation, was of the pioneer stock of the state, and was a grandson of old Adam Poe of "Big Foote" notoriety, that it was hoped there would be an opening for Poe on Johnson's Island or in any similar service, that he thought Poe's appointment to some place of moderate emolument and responsibility would be generally satisfactory and certainly gratifying to many personal friends, and that he was confident Poe would discharge the duties of such a position with more than ordinary capacity and with great diligence and strict integrity.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 52]

January 6, 1862
W.E. Prince, Major Commanding, 3rd Infantry, Headquarters, Ft. Leavenworth, [Kansas]. To Governor Charles Robinson, Lawrence, Kansas. True copy of a letter stating that Captain Elmer Otis of the 4th Cavalry, regular service was now on duty at Ft. Leavenworth, that Otis was desirous, as they all were, of securing some grade in the service which would benefit both himself and the service, and that by a reference to the Governor's order of reorganization, he found that the 5th Regiment of Kansas Volunteers had no Colonel as yet; recommending Otis for this position; and stating that Otis' experience in the army, which was built upon a military education at West Point, explained, without the expression of his endorsement, Otis' qualifications for the office, and that if the Governor could advance Otis' interest in the matter, he felt satisfied it would be fully appreciated by the regular army and promote the public interest. Bears a note from D.W. Denver, Brigadier General, and D. Hunter, Major General; stating that Otis would undoubtedly make a most excellent Colonel of a regiment, and that it was hardly probable that any better could be selected.
2 pp. [Series 147-34: 63]

January 11, 1862
C.P. Buckingham, Adjutant General of Ohio, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Circular to regimental commanders stating that their force must be fitted for the field as rapidly as possible and held in constant readiness, that they were to press vigorously forward with the recruiting service, that transportation would be granted on their requisition for such parties as they might send out, but the number of recruiters must not be unnecessarily increased so as to weaken the force in camp, that they would order all into camp who were not on recruiting service, that they would grant no leave of absence to officer or man except in cases of the most absolute and pressing importance, that if the regiment was in active service, such as would be held to be a sufficient reason for granting a furlough was to be communicated by the regimental Adjutant to the Adjutant General's Office with his morning field report, and that they were to organize full companies and have muster-in rolls made up as rapidly as possible.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 187]

January 20, 1862
W[illiam] Patterson, et. al., Van Wert, Van Wert County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter signed by nine individuals; recommending Captain J.D. Clark for the appointment of Major of one of the Ohio regiments; and stating that Clark was one of the first men in Van Wert who volunteered at the call of the President for three months' volunteers, that Clark raised a company and commanded it in the 15th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry (three months' service), that Clark's conduct as an officer and soldier commanded the confidence and esteem of all the officers of the regiment, that Clark was a good scholar, an intelligent man, a sterling patriot, and worthy of confidence, and that they trusted Tod would confer the appointment on Clark.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 57]

January 21, 1862
William Patterson, Van Wert, Van Wert County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that he had united with others in recommending Captain J.D. Clark to Tod for the appointment of Major of one of the regiments lately gotten up in Ohio, that the gentlemen who joined him in the recommendation were good, reliable men among whom were the Probate Judge, Auditor, Sheriff, etc., and no better men could be found in the state, that they were engaged heart and soul in the prosecution of the war and putting down the rebellion, that they would not engage in recommending an unworthy man, that they all believed in what they had recommended Clark to be, that the people of Van Wert County were patriotic, that they raised a company of three months' volunteers and now had four companies of three years' men in the field, and that they had also donated and sent forward one hundred and fifty dollars worth of clothing and hospital stores for the army; and asking if they might not, with propriety, request the appointment of field officer for their friend.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 56]

January 22, 1862
Jared P. Kirtland, Cleveland Medical College, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter inviting Tod's attention to the case of Lieutenant John F. Cutler, formerly of the 23rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and stating that John A. Foot of Cleveland would fully explain to Tod all the facts relating to the matter, that he knew Cutler to be an active and reliable young man, and far better versed in military knowledge and military drill than most of the junior officers in the service, and that upon investigating the case, he had no doubt Tod would discover that Cutler was worthy of confidence.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 143]

January 23, 1862
John A. Foot, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that John F. Cutler, son of O. Cutler of Cleveland, was elected Sergeant by a company in the 23rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and promoted from that position successively to the posts of Orderly and 2nd Lieutenant of the same company, that Cutler resigned his commission in the early part of the previous Fall, supposing he could easily resume it after visiting his home and seeing a brother who was dying from disease most likely contracted in the service, that instead of this, Cutler found that his resignation created a disability which could only be removed by the War Department, that Cutler's father had sent four sons into the service, three of them as Private soldiers and Cutler in the humble capacity of a noncommissioned officer, that not quite 20 years of age, Cutler was so perfectly acquainted with the drill and so thoroughly a soldier in all his tastes that he rose without any extensive aid through the position of Orderly to that of 2nd Lieutenant, that this gratified his father exceedingly, that when Cutler's father found that his son had resigned and was thereby ineligible to his former position, he was almost beside himself, that coming to a knowledge of these facts from being distantly connected with the family, he made out a statement for Cutler to the War Department, that Cutler was in service in western Virginia and so constantly on the move after his appointment as 2nd Lieutenant that his uniform and sword (the latter a gift from a prominent citizen of Cleveland) never reached him, although following hard after him, that this fact necessitated Cutler being without the outward distinctions and badges of his office while performing its duties, that this very much mortified Cutler, that Cutler's company was from a part of the state remote from Cleveland, that this left Cutler introduced into the company merely from his full acquaintance with drill and tactics, that Cutler had no one to advise him against a resignation or aid him to get a furlough, that he accompanied Cutler's statement with one of his own, that Governor [William] Dennison also kindly accompanied these statements with one of his own and a request that the request of Cutler be complied with, that it seemed the request was granted, but this did not come to his knowledge until January 22, that in the meantime, Cutler's brother was dead and buried, probably a victim to the service of his country as much as if he had died on the battlefield, that the father could resignedly bear this, but could not resignedly see his son John out of a position to which he was worthily entitled by capacity, courage, and service, that the son had gone back into the service and was now an Orderly Sergeant in the 54th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that the son was very popular in the regiment, that although the son was acquainted with all kinds of drill, he rather preferred the Zouaves and would like a 2nd Lieutenancy in said regiment if there was a vacancy, that the father and son would feel under great obligation to Tod for the appointment of the son to a 2nd Lieutenancy in any corps, and that feeling assured that John F. Cutler was eminently qualified, he joined in the request.
4 pp. [Series 147-34: 142]

January 25, 1862
Jesse H. McMath, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that Adonis McMath, a Private in Company C, 15th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, was an applicant for a 2nd Lieutenant's commission in said regiment; requesting that McMath's name be placed upon the books for said appointment; and stating that McMath was a gentleman of good moral character, served with credit in the three months' service, and was in every way well qualified for 2nd Lieutenant.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 147]

January 26, 1862
Seabury C. Ford, Burton, Geauga County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that according to the papers of late, there were many changes occurring and promotions being made among the officers of the 41st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; introducing to Tod's favorable notice for promotion, a young man who seemed to justly merit and be fully qualified for a higher position than that which he now held; and stating that he referred to his father's nephew, E.A. Ford, 1st Sergeant of Company B, that Ford was among the first in Geauga County to volunteer at the three months' call and was unanimously elected Captain, that the company, like many others raised at the time, was not accepted, that Ford was then elected Captain of a company of Militia of the Reserve organized under the law passed the previous winter, that Ford held said post until he volunteered in the three years' service, that Ford was the first to move in raising the present Company B of the 41st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry and was very energetic, spending his entire time for several weeks, that at the election of officers, Ford stepped forward and nominated the officers who were first commissioned, willing to take a lower position and rise meritoriously to a higher rank, that while the regiment was at Cleveland, the regimental officers were heard to say that Ford was one of the best drill officers in the regiment, that he understood this high remark was endorsed by Colonel [William B.] Hazen, and that Ford had a host of friends among Tod's old acquaintances locally who desired to see him promoted if he was (as they believed) worthy. Bears the endorsement of P[eter] Hitchcock.
2 pp. [Series 147-34: 158]

February 1, 1862
A.G. Fitch, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster, Gauley Bridge, Virginia. To Governor David Tod. Letter recommending A[sa] G. Dimmock of the 1st Independent Battery, Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery; and stating that for some time, Dimmock had been in the Commissary Department at Gauley Bridge, that from what he had observed, Dimmock had been faithful and attentive to his duties, and that he believed Dimmock would fill a higher position with honor to himself and to the interest of any department in which he might be placed. Bears the endorsement of J[ames] L. Drake, Captain, 23rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 105]

February 4, 1862
H[enry] B. Hunter, Lieutenant Colonel, 61st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter stating that he had addressed a few lines to Governor David Tod requesting to be assigned to some regiment now or about to go into the field, that he trusted it would not be intruding too much if he requested that Buckingham bear in mind that he would much prefer being actually engaged than to continue recruiting, and that if Buckingham could, without prejudice to others, so assign him, he would indeed be thankful.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 62]

February 4, 1862
Gustav C.E. Weber, Surgeon General, Headquarters, Ohio Volunteer Militia, Surgeon General's Office, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that per orders, he was presenting the names of various gentlemen as suitable persons for the posts of Surgeon and Assistant Surgeon of the army, having passed the proper examination before the former medical board.
2 pp. [Series 147-34: 188]

February 9, 1862
D[avid] Hunter, Major General, Headquarters, Department of Kansas, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter addressing the Governor on behalf of his friend, Captain Elmer Otis, 4th U.S. Cavalry, a native of Ohio for whose promotion and success in the army he was solicitous; and stating that having been acquainted with the military attainments and personal character of Otis for the last eight years and holding both in high respect, he had endeavored to procure Otis' appointment to the Colonelcy of some volunteer cavalry regiment in Kansas, that he would doubtless have succeeded through the kindness and appreciation of Governor [Charles] Robinson of Kansas had it not been for the order transferring Otis with his command to the Department of the Ohio, that he regarded Otis as an admirable cavalry officer, earnest, industrious, and ambitious, that Otis was one who would labor conscientiously and effectively to bring any volunteer regiment placed under his command up to the standard of efficiency attained in the regular service, that Otis also had the gift of maintaining discipline among his men without the exhibition of harshness, that he believed Otis would make an officer as popular as he would certainly be efficient, that in his personal character, Otis was a gentleman of steady and unblemished habits who would set an example of order and sobriety to his men, the value of which could not be too highly estimated, and that Otis' promotion would be a promotion of the public interests.
3 pp. [Series 147-34: 65]

February 10, 1862
W[illiam] H. Gibson, [Colonel], 49th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Headquarters, Camp Wood. To Adjutant General C.P. Buckingham. Letter regarding various promotions to fill vacancies in the regiment.
2 pp. [Series 147-34: 185]

February 15, 1862
Elmer Otis, Captain, 4th Cavalry, Louisville, Kentucky. To the Governor of Ohio. Letter applying for a Colonelcy in the Ohio volunteers; and stating that he hailed from Ohio and preferred a regiment from his native state, that he was sending recommendations from persons high in rank who had known him for years, that he entered West Point in 1849 and graduated in 1853, that he had passed through all the intermediate grades and was now a Captain in the 4th Regiment of U.S. Cavalry, that during this time, he had been in constant active service on the whole Indian frontier, having seen as much active service as any officer who entered the service with himself, that as to drilling and disciplining his men, he had always succeeded well, that if he had a regiment all together, he could bring them to good drill and discipline in a short time, and that should the Governor see fit to give him the appointment, he would try to render himself worthy of the same and to do credit to their own state.
2 pp. [Series 147-34: 64]

February 21, 1862
P[eter] A. Tyler, Captain, Commanding Post, Montgomery City, Missouri, and Ozro J. Dodds, Captain, Commanding Post at Wellsville. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that the office of Lieutenant Colonel of the 81st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry was vacant and had been since December 10, 1861, that it was made so by the resignation of Lieutenant Colonel John A. Turley while the regiment was stationed at Hermann, Missouri, and that they deemed it important for the welfare of the regiment and the service that said vacancy be filled forthwith.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 134]

February 21, 1862
P[eter] A. Tyler, Captain, Commanding Post at Montgomery City, Missouri. To Governor David Tod. Letter stating that the 81st Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry had but one field officer since December 10, 1861, that they had been trying to have Colonel [Thomas] Morton, the officer in command, certify said vacancies to Tod, that for some reason, Morton refused to do so, that as he and Captain [Ozro J.] Dodds felt the importance of one other field officer, they had officially declared said vacancy, that he had the command of the regiment for three weeks after Lieutenant Colonel [John A.] Turley resigned, that Dodds was at Wellsville, that their regiment was scattered along the North Missouri Railroad, that Morton's headquarters were at Danville, and that if Tod should feel disposed to give him position in the field, he was at his service.
2 pp. [Series 147-34: 135]

[February 25?, 1862]
O[liver] P. Cotterill, et. al., Company K, 70th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. To? Letter signed by ten members of Company K, 70th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and recommending Thomas L. Scott as a suitable person for 2nd Lieutenant thereof.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 113]

[February 25?, 1862]
Hiram S. Kerr, et. al., Company K, 70th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. To? Letter signed by thirty-two members of Company K, 70th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and recommending Andrew J. Sibrel as a suitable person for 2nd Lieutenant thereof.
1 p. [Series 147-34: 112]